Tag: pranayama

meditation, practice, pranayama, relaxation, viniyoga, yoga, yoga classes, yoga philosophy

The 5 W’s of Alteayoga

Who: Rachel Rose, yoga teacher, massage therapist, chemist, Canadian What: Hatha yoga classes, private yoga classes, meditation classes, pranayama classes. Where: Altea Salut, Calle Vents Vius 6-bajo, Altea, Alicante When: Tuesdays 20:00-21:15 and Fridays 09:30-10:45 (group classes) and Tuesdays-Thursdays for private sessions. Why: I believe in the power of yoga the heal the body, the […]

practice, Series: How we breathe, to yog, viniyoga

How We Breathe: Mouthbreathing

Introduction Mouth breathing is an all too common habit, and one that can be broken through yogic breathing techniques called pranayama.  In today’s post, I am going to talk about how mouth breathing can become habitual, the problems brought on my this bad habit and some ideas on how to correct mouth breathing. The mouth-breathing […]

patience, practice, thoughts and musings, to yog, yoga classes, yoga philosophy

The qualities of a yoga practice – Santosha and Ahimsa

I had a great group come along for class yesterday afternoon.  We did a practice designed for the legs and the âpana.  We all had a good go at some standing balances, with a transition between two postures. And mostly everyone fell out of the poses at least once. Teaching a class is a dynamic, […]

patience, practice, to yog, viniyoga, yoga classes, yoga philosophy

Yoga is meant to calm me…so why do I feel so nervous?

This is a brilliant question that I received this week from a newcomer to class.  This particular lady was recommended yoga by her doctor, so comes as a special case.  Ideally, it must be said, such a person would have private tuition.  But, the mere fact that she has managed to make contact and come […]

practice, yoga philosophy

Bring calm into your nervous system via breathing

Here is a short video that deals with the relationship between the breath and the emotions.  In a study, scientists discovered that when emotions are elicited in trial participants, their breathing pattern changes.  But the interesting thing is that the opposite thing also happens:  When breathing patterns are altered, the corresponding emotion is elicited.  Let’s […]